Cindy Hutter

Removing the Burder of Care Coordination

Posted January 06, 2014 by Cindy Hutter, MBA

This was originally posted July 2013

The Sunday after Thanksgiving 2005, I woke up in the middle of the night with sharp pains in my stomach. Growing up, the universal remedy for nearly everything in our household was Pepto-Bismol. At 26, that still stuck with me. I took a slug from the glorious pink bottle that maintained a reserved spot in the refrigerator door rack and went back to bed.

Within 20 minutes I was up again, hunched over in pain and nudging my then-fiancée, Steve, to wake up. I tend to have a high tolerance for pain. I’ve finished a half marathon with a nagging pain in my knee that turned out to be several sprained ligaments. When I told Steve I needed to go to the hospital, we both knew something was amiss.


My first thought was my appendix had burst. I was wrong, very wrong. I had a cyst the size of a softball on my left ovary and it had ruptured. I had emergency surgery to remove the cyst. A week later, when the pathology came back, I got my diagnosis. I had ovarian cancer.

Ovarian cancer is known as the silent killer, mainly because there are no good tests to detect the disease and symptoms typically don’t present themselves until the cancer has spread. The cancer is most commonly diagnosed in elderly women for whom life expectancy after diagnosis is not very good. Since it is rare to get the disease at a young age, protocols for long-term, post treatment care plans are nonexistent.

After a second surgery to remove my left ovary and all signs of the cancer, I met with my surgeon a few times for follow-up and then she was off to save others with her scalpel, as she should be. Now what? I wasn’t sure how and by whom my follow-up care would be managed.

Typically very healthy, I didn’t see my primary care physician frequently enough to develop a relationship. And since I had been to the gynecologist for a checkup just weeks prior to the cyst rupturing, I had little confidence in her ability to oversee my long-term care. I felt like a foreigner alone in an unknown land and the only things in my suitcase were the names of a few high-risk gynecologists and a copy of my medical record.

This experience, plus now my work at NICHQ, has caused me to think about the issues of patient advocacy, medical care transition and coordination in a new light. Patients (and their families) are too often burdened with the responsibility of being their own advocates. This is especially true for patients with special healthcare needs and when young adults transition out of pediatric care, both of which were true in my case. I had never heard of the concept of a medical home before coming to NICHQ, but I’ve now seen what is possible in a patient-focused system where primary care physicians and specialists coordinate to deliver high-quality healthcare. In situations like mine, where there are no established protocols to follow, the need for a medical home is most critical—and paradoxically, most lacking.

Since joining NICHQ last year, I’ve seen our various project teams tackle these intertwined issues. In our medical home project, teams of pediatric offices have been testing and now implementing best practices for transitioning patients to adult practices. This is helping to close the gap in care many young adults experience when they age out of a pediatric practice, which can be particularly problematic for patients with health issues like autism, sickle cell disease and others. In another project, NICHQ and its partners are piloting guidelines for bridging childhood and adult care for sickle cell patients by teaching adolescents to be advocates for their own care coordination in the absence of (or in addition to) a medical home. And NICHQ’s autism project is addressing how to coordinate follow-up care with community physicians to remove some of the burden from overwhelmed specialty clinics. Across these and other projects, teams are introducing patient navigator programs and additional innovations to provide assistance to those who need help managing the healthcare system and to better support a medical home model.

I find hope in this work. By transforming into medical homes, practices are improving the ways care providers interact to provide holistic care to patients. As a result, a child born today with sickle cell disease is more likely to have a smooth transition to adult care and the family of a child diagnosed with autism will more easily find a primary care doctor who is versed in relevant treatment guidelines. And hopefully, as this work continues to spread, people with any type of special healthcare need will more easily find a way to a long-term care plan and a supportive team.

Fortunately, my story has a happy ending. After a few failed attempts, I found a gynecologist that I love and trust. We’re managing my care together, making up the rulebook as we go. We make sure I have checkups every six months and follow a treatment regimen. And when I’m ready, we’ll start the discussion of considering some proactive surgery to limit my odds of recurrence. One thing, however, that we no longer talk about is my fertility concerns. Steve and I are expecting our first child in October.

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