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Featured Toolkit:

Next Steps: A Practitioner's Guide For Themed Follow-up Visits For Their Patients to Achieve a Healthy Weight
Next Steps: A Practitioner's Guide For Themed Follow-up
Visits For Their Patients to Achieve a Healthy Weight

If you are a member of any of the following groups, please click below to see the sessions that may be of interest to you:

Hospital Personnel
Nurses
Quality Improvement Professionals
Community-based Organizations Staff
Family Leaders
Health Information Technology Professionals
Pediatric Residents

Hospital Specific Sessions

Developing a Safety Program: How to Move Your “Dots”

Peter Lachman, Consultant, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust and  Royal Free Hospital Hampstead NHS Trust;
Jayant Deshpande, Executive Physician for Patient Quality and Safety, Monroe Carell, Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt;
Anne Matlow MD, Medical Director of Patient Safety and the Director of the Infection Prevention and Control at Sick Kids Hospital in Toronto, Professor in the Departments of Pediatrics, and Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology at the University of Toronto;
Stephen Muething, MD, Associate Professor at the University of Cincinnati and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center; 
Matt Scanlon, Associate Professor of Pediatrics in Critical Care at Medical College of Wisconsin, and Associate Medical Director of Information Services at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin;
Paul Sharek, MD, Assistant professor of Pediatrics at Stanford University, a pediatric hospitalist, and  Medical Director of Quality Management and Chief Clinical Patient Safety Officer at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital

Patient safety is now a prerequisite in healthcare. All services need to define their outcomes in terms of safety and quality. The vulnerability of children makes the importance of patient safety a key factor in the delivery of healthcare delivery. This session will be an in-depth examination of the fundamentals of patient safety in pediatrics and child heath and the specific risks children and neonates face. The session will focus on measurement and how it can be used to accelerate change.

Without a Tracer…Your Hospital May Fail to See Risks Lurking Within the System

Ginny Boos RN, BSN, CPHQ, Clinical Safety Officer, Children’s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics (CMHC);
Carol Kemper RN, PhD, CPHQ, Senior Director of Quality and Safety, CMHC;
Carol Moore RN, BSN, QI Project Coordinator Department of Quality and Safety, CMHC;
Sheryl Chadwick, Family Centered Care Coordinator, CMHC; DeeJo Miller, Family Centered Care Coordinator, CMHC

Keeping patients safe within the healthcare organization requires an understanding of the effectiveness of internal processes and risks inherent in the system.  Tracer methods are used to evaluate system functioning proactively and guide quality initiatives. This session will guide participants in the development of a tracer program and describe how tracers enhance an established quality improvement program. Children’s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics (CMHC) implemented a qualitative program consisting of 4 types of tracers.  The four types of tracers that will be discussed are Traditional, High Risk, Patient Flow, and Patient Experience.

I had a Dream of Healthcare (E)quality...

Boris Kalanj MSW, LISW, Director of Healthcare Equity, Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota; 
Douglass L. Jackson DMD, MS, PhD, Chief, Center for Diversity at Health Equity, Seattle Children’s Hospital;
John D. Cowden MD, MPH, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Medical Director, Office of Equity and Diversity, Children’s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics

Pediatric hospitals should have a particular interest in eliminating racial and ethnic disparities in healthcare, because U.S. children, as a population, disproportionately come from demographic minority groups compared to the population overall. While it is common for healthcare organizations to assume that the care they provide is equitable, without purposeful measurement they will not know whether this is true. Seattle Children's Hospital and Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota have taken proactive steps to assess healthcare equity and have implemented interventions in key areas to reduce disparities and address equity on a routine basis. This session will highlight the steps needed  to examine equity, including creating a sense of urgency and crafting an organizational vision. Participants will learn about the specific processes, measures, interventions and programs that have been implemented to reduce the disparities and discuss how these  can be adapted to meet similar needs in other pediatric hospitals.

Quality Improvement in Cystic Fibrosis Care

Michael S. Schechter, MD, MPH, Cystic Fibrosis Center Director, Emory University School of Medicine;
Kathryn Sabadosa MPH, Quality Improvement Project Manager, The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice;
Elizabeth Revilla MS, RD, CSP, Clinical Nutritionist, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory Cystic Fibrosis Center;
Brandy Jones, Parent Advisor, Emory Cystic Fibrosis Center;
Tamila Dulaney BSN, RN, CPN, Staff Nurse 3, Resource, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta-Egleston Hospital;
Hartley Price MPT, Physical Therapist, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta-Egleston Hospital;
Christine Middour BS, RRT, Airway Clearance Specialist, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta- Egleston Hospital;
Amy R. Shipp LMSW, Social Worker, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta;
Alissa Siragusa CCLS, Child Life Specialist, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta

Efforts regarding quality improvement and the evolution of expectations regarding Cystic Fibrosis care that has occurred in the last decade are best understood in the context of the overall healthcare delivery system.  This session will begin with a description of the national quality initiative sponsored by the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.  Discussion will include the key role of patient registry data in spreading an appreciation of variations in performance and outcomes; the formation and adoption of Cystic Fibrosis QI learning collaboratives; the national benchmarking projects as a novel way to learn of effective approaches to care; the development of practice guidelines; and support of patient/family involvement and transparency.  The second part will feature a presentation of outpatient initiatives introduced by care teams at the Emory University Cystic Fibrosis Center and affiliate program to improve processes and disease outcomes. 

Building Safety Teams to Identify and Prevent Errors in Ambulatory Pediatrics
Level 2 intermediate

Daniel R. Neuspiel, MD, MPH, Director of Ambulatory Pediatrics, Levine Children’s Hospital;
Erin H. Stubbs MD, Chief Pediatric Resident, Levine Children’s Hospital of Carolinas Medical Center

Mandatory hospital incident reporting systems miss many medical errors, appear punitive, seek to blame individuals for mistakes, and are underutilized. A non-punitive systems approach, rather than the traditional blaming culture, is more effective in identifying and addressing errors. The presentation will summarize what is currently known about the sources of medical error in ambulatory pediatrics. An effective model will be detailed, including building a multidisciplinary safety team, setting up a non-punitive reporting system, doing root-cause analysis of error reports, developing and implementing rapid system changes to prevent future errors, and sustaining changes. Participants will learn how to implement a similar model in their own settings.

Development and Implementation of a Quality Program in a Pediatric Emergency Setting
Level 2 intermediate

Tracy Hartman MHA, CPHQ, ASQ SSGB, Quality Improvement Project Coordinator, Children’s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics;
Stacy L. Doyle RN, BSN, MBA, CPN
, Emergency Department Manager, Children’s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics

Quality improvement efforts in the emergency setting are often difficult due to many factors, which include multiple specialties, variances in patient population, variety in practice, typical personalities in the emergency setting, constantly changing activities, and issues in the department. The presentation demonstrates the implementation of rapid cycle improvement and evaluates the special challenges and opportunities related to improvement in an emergency setting by following an example of decreasing the rates of blood culture contaminations in the Emergency Room and two Urgent Care Centers at Children’s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics. While leading participants step-by-step through a rapid cycle project with positive clinical outcomes, this presentation will show how to maintain gains and discover new improvement opportunities.

Implementing Lean to Improve Emergency Department Throughput
Level 1 core

Jennifer Berdis RN, BSN, CPN, Manager of Emergency Services, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta; 
Jeff Rehberg, BIE, ME, Manager of Process Improvement, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta;
Marianne Hatfield, BSN, RN, CENP; System Director of Emergency Services, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta

The Emergency Department on the Scottish Rite Campus of Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, utilized Lean principles to improve the time from triage to physician assessment, to decrease the overall length of stay for emergency department patients, and to improve the equity of physician assignment by decreasing decision-making choices, and aligning available resources to start patient treatment. The new process has resulted in marked success with no increase in staffing, while seeing a significant increase in patient volume. Participants will learn how implementation of Lean principles can be applied in their settings with similar results.

Performance Improvement Team Efforts Reduce Incidence of Severe Retinopathy of Prematurity Requiring Laser Therapy
Level 2 intermediate

Grace Propper RN, MS, CPNP, NNP-BC, Quality Management Practitioner at Stony Brook University Hospital;
Paul F. Murphy BA, Data Manager, Continuous Quality Improvement, Stony Brook University Hospital;
Shanthy Sridhar MD, Medical Director, Stony Brook University Hospital

Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a disease that affects the immature vasculature of premature infants,  all babies less than 1500g birth weight or younger than 32 weeks gestational age at birth are at risk of developing ROP. One goal of our team is to decrease the number of premature infants that require laser therapy to treat ROP.  Participants will learn how ventilator management and O2 saturation goal protocols were developed and implemented applying best practice and how the use of daily goal sheets coupled with multidisciplinary “lightning rounds” improved compliance with maintaining infants in the preferred saturation range. 

Designing a Robust Quality Improvement Program for Pediatric Residents
Level 2 intermediate

Greg Randolph MD, MPH, Co-Director, North Carolina Children’s Center for Clinical Excellence, Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Adjunct Associate Professor of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill;
Laura Noonan MD, Director, Center for Pediatric Excellence, Department of Pediatrics, Levine Children’s Hospital at Carolinas Medical Center

This session will describe two models that have successfully aligned resident education with the need for improved quality of care. The Residency Programs at University of North Carolina and Carolinas Medical Center have developed comprehensive Resident QI Programs to assure each resident acquires knowledge about QI methods and tools and learns how to incorporate QI into their clinical practice. These programs incorporate QI by providing a standardized, longitudinal, mentored, experiential curriculum with the goal of increasing residents' knowledge, skills, and abilities to apply QI.  Participants will be provided with the basic tools and implementation strategies that can be used to create or improve their organization's residency QI program.

The Confluence of HIT, Medical Home, and P4P for Pediatric Quality
Level 3 advanced studies

Donald E. Lighter MD, MBA, FAAP, FACHE, Vice President for Quality, WellCare Health Plan, Tampa, Florida;
Christopher Stille, MD, Professor, University of Massachusetts

The innovative session is designed to acquaint participants with the use of health information technology to produce the data required to satisfy the requirements for NCQA certification, and HEDIS measures involved in P4P programs. The confluence of three important factors has finally provided the basis for promoting quality in health care. This presentation discusses HEDIS measures, data requirements, NCQA certification for the Medical Home, and then provides the background for IT systems that can integrate quality and financial factors for quality care. Participants will develop thorough understanding of payer mechanisms for measuring quality and designing P4P, P4Q, and PQRI programs as well as NCQA Medical Home certification is conducted and how a structured framework can enhance accreditation efforts.

Operation Prevent Flu Meets H1N1-The Unseasonal Surge in a Children's Healthcare System
Level 1 core
Family Leader Session

J. Renee Warner Watson, Manager-Infection Control and Occupational Health Children's Healthcare of Atlanta

Children's Healthcare of Atlanta (CHOA) experienced extreme surges of emergency room volumes during August and September 2009. This surge related to the highest prevalence of H1N1 influenza within the United States. The healthcare system could have been disabled had it not been for the multidisciplinary approach and the development of seven related teams working to ensure patient safety, and employee safety in the face of staff shortages and supply shortages. Participants will learn how the team process was utilized and will be provided the tools developed to balance science with logistics to ensure that no negative outcomes were realized.

Making the White Board the “Right Board:” Integrating IT to Improve Ward Patient Awareness
Level 3 advanced studies

James P. Cappon, MD, Medical Director of Quality and Patient Safety, Children's Hospital of Orange County, Orange, California

Background Miscommunication is at root of most significant medical error. Incorporating the Pediatric Early Warning System (PEWS) physiology-based monitoring of ward patients, we converted from a traditional Nursing Station white board to a large, EMR-connected LCD, providing an instant “snapshot” of patient acuity thereby advancing efforts to improve communication and situational awareness of patient status. Our design dramatically improves organizational awareness of non-ICU patient status by attempting to reduce the chances for miscommunication to occur. Participants will learn how this eBoard model can readily be applied to inpatient settings by design. Modifications could easily be performed in almost unlimited fashion to almost any clinical scenario.

Scope of a Tertiary Center Care Coordination Program for Medically Complex and Fragile Children with Chronic Conditions
Level 2 intermediate
Family Leader Session

John B. Gordon MD, Medical Director, Special Needs Program, Children's Hospital of Wisconsin;
Holly Colby RN, MS, Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin;
Anne Juhlmann BSN, Nurse Planner, Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin

The goal of this presentation is to describe the clinical and academic activities of a well established tertiary academic center care coordination program with particular emphasis on ensuring seamless inpatient and outpatient care through partnerships with families and Medical Homes, approaches to educating the next generation of physicians and nurses about the needs of this growing population; and strategies for ensuring sustainability and ability to replicate the model.

Nursing Sessions

Project Healthy Schools: Community-University Collaboration to Reduce CVD Risk Factors in Youth
Level 1 core

Jean DuRussel-Weston RN, MPH, CHES, Manager, Project Healthy Schools, University of Michigan Health System

Project Healthy Schools is a community-university partnership providing school-based programming to reduce childhood obesity and its long-term health risks. This session describes 5 years of survey and physiologic data and introduces a toolkit for program implementation. The toolkit will be available on our Web site along with consultation as needed.

Access to and Utilization of Health Services by Rural-Dwelling Children: Challenges in Appalachia
Level 2 intermediate

Laureen H. Smith PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, The Ohio State University

This session will present research findings comparing health status, general health and BMI, of rural dwelling children to children living in Appalachia. Comparisons also are made between rural children and two sub-groups within Appalachia with the incorporation of controls for insurance status. This study is unique because most geographical comparisons have been between rural and urban children. Participants will learn about policy and health care practice implications based on the study findings.

The Future of Nursing: Better Capacity to Improve Quality and Safety
Level 1 core

Susan B. Hassmiller PhD, RN, FAAN, Senior Advisor for Nursing, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Session will describe how the road to improved quality of care will require a new set of skills by nurses including an enhanced curriculum on safety and quality at all schools of nursing, an appreciation for interdisciplinary Collaboration, better partnerships between academia and practice, a seat at all quality/safety decision making tables, and a new sense of responsibility and accountability to patients by following an evidence based practice.

Scope of a Tert­iary Center Care Coordination Program for Medically Complex and Fragile Children with Chronic Conditions
Level 2 intermediate
Family Leader Session

John B. Gordon MD, Medical director, Special Needs Program, Children's Hospital of Wisconsin;
Holly Colby RN, MS, Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin;
Anne Juhlmann BSN, Nurse Planner, Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin

The goal of this presentation is to describe the clinical and academic activities of a well established tertiary academic center care coordination program with particular emphasis on ensuring seamless inpatient and outpatient care through partnerships with families and Medical Homes, approaches to educating the next generation of physicians and nurses about the needs of this growing population; and strategies for ensuring sustainability and ability to replicate the model.

Quality Improvement Professionals

Developing a Safety Program: How to Move Your "Dots"

Peter Lachman, Consultant, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust and Royal Free Hospital Hampstead NHS Trust;
Jayant Deshpande, Executive Physician for Patient Quality and Safety, Monroe Carell, Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt;
Anne Matlow, Medical Director of Patient Safety and the Director of the Infection Prevention and Control at Sick Kids Hospital in Toronto, Professor in the Departments of Pediatrics, and Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology at the University of Toronto;
Stephen Muething MD, Associate Professor at the University of Cincinnati and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center;
Matt Scanlon, Associate Professor of Pediatrics in Critical Care at Medical College of Wisconsin, and Associate Medical Director of Information Services at Children's Hospital of Wisconsin;
Paul Sharek MD, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Stanford University, a pediatric hospitalist, and Medical Director of Quality Management and Chief Clinical Patient Safety Officer at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital;
Polly Stevens, Director of Quality and Risk Management at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto

Patient safety is now a prerequisite in healthcare. All services need to define their outcomes in terms of safety and quality. The vulnerability of children makes the importance of patient safety a key factor in the delivery of healthcare delivery. This session will be an in-depth examination of the fundamentals of patient safety in pediatrics and child heath and the specific risks children and neonates face. The session will focus on measurement and how it can be used to accelerate change.

Quality Improvement 201: Context-Relevant QI Leadership Training for the Busy Clinician
Level 2 intermediate

Christopher Stille MD, MPH, Academic Generalist Pediatrician, Researcher, Associate Professor, University of Massachusetts Medical School;
Jeanne McBride RN, BSN, MM, QI Project Manager, UMass Medical School/UMass Memorial Center, Advancement of Primary Care

The University of Massachusetts Medical School developed a 20-session "Quality Scholars" curriculum designed to be completed by faculty interested in leading QI projects in their practice environments.  This session will present the structure of the Quality Scholars program, list resources needed for attendees to create such a program in their own institutions, deliver a short sampling of program content, describe evaluation methods for the project, and describe how this program can meet the current and future needs of QI leaders.

QI Learning Collaborative to Improve the Documentation of BMI and Nutrition and Activity Counseling
Level 2 intermediate

Steve Cook MD, MPH, Assistant Professor, University of Rochester;
Jan Schriefer MBA, DrPH, Director, Pediatric Quality Improvement, University of Rochester Medical Center

The Greater Rochester Obesity Collaborative is working with local pediatric practices using a quality improvement learning collaborative approach as the framework to improve BMI documentation, classification and counseling rates for nutrition and activity. Participants will learn about the documented improvements in all of the targeted process measures and how these results suggest that the learning collaborative efforts promoted improvements in obesity identification and counseling.

The Lean Team: Enhancing School-Based Obesity Prevention Programs by Including Services for Teachers
Level 2 intermediate

Coleen Martin MS, RD, LD, Program Director, Medical University of South Carolina;
Janice D. Key MD, Faculty, MUSC College of Graduate Studies

This presentation describes a unique method for implementation of school-based obesity programs. The Lean Team uses an inclusive and coordinated approach to involve the school as well as the community in its school-based obesity prevention program. The Lean Team program initially targets teachers and school staff. This implementation plan leads to improved behaviors modeled by teachers and their participation in the program results in increased participation by students. Team members also are involved in implementation of other program components including a needs assessment of the school and promotion of policy changes at the school. This model was found to be particularly effective in schools with predominantly minority or low-income students which had little parental involvement.

Development and Implementation of a Quality Program in a Pediatric Emergency Setting
Level 2 intermediate

Tracy Hartman MHA, CPHQ, ASQ SSGB, Quality Improvement Project Coordinator, Children’s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics;
Stacy L. Doyle RN, BSN, MBA, CPN, Emergency Department Manager, Children’s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics

Quality improvement efforts in the emergency setting are often difficult due to many factors, which include multiple specialties, variances in patient population, variety in practice, typical personalities in the emergency setting, constantly changing activities, and issues in the department. The presentation demonstrates the implementation of rapid cycle improvement and evaluates the special challenges and opportunities related to improvement in an emergency setting by following an example of decreasing the rates of blood culture contaminations in the Emergency Room and two Urgent Care Centers at Children’s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics. While leading participants step-by-step through a rapid cycle project with positive clinical outcomes, this presentation will show how to maintain gains and discover new improvement opportunities.

Implementing Lean to Improve Emergency Department Throughput
Level 1 core

Jennifer Berdis RN, BSN, CPN, Manager of Emergency Services, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta (CHOA); 
Jeff Rehberg BIE, ME, Manager of Process Improvement, CHOA;
Marianne Hatfield BSN, RN, CENP, System Director of Emergency Services, CHOA

The Emergency Department on the Scottish Rite Campus of Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, utilized Lean principles to improve the time from triage to physician assessment, to decrease the overall length of stay for emergency department patients, and to improve the equity of physician assignment by decreasing decision-making choices, and aligning available resources to start patient treatment. The new process has resulted in marked success with no increase in staffing, while seeing a significant increase in patient volume. Participants will learn how implementation of Lean principles can be applied in their settings with similar results.

Designing a Robust Quality Improvement Program for Pediatric Residents
Level 2 intermediate

Greg Randolph MD, MPH, Co-Director, North Carolina Children’s Center for Clinical Excellence;
Laura Noonan MD, Director, Center for Pediatric Excellence, Department of Pediatrics, Levine Children’s Hospital at Carolinas Medical Center

This session will describe two models that have successfully aligned resident education with the need for improved quality of care. The Residency Programs at University of North Carolina and Carolinas Medical Center have developed comprehensive Resident QI Programs to assure each resident acquires knowledge about QI methods and tools and learns how to incorporate QI into their clinical practice. These programs incorporate QI by providing a standardized, longitudinal, mentored, experiential curriculum with the goal of increasing residents' knowledge, skills, and abilities to apply QI.  Participants will be provided with the basic tools and implementation strategies that can be used to create or improve their organization's residency QI program.

Quality Improvement in the Management of Children with Sickle Cell Disease
Level 1 core
Family Leader Session

Peter A. Lane MD, Director, Sickle Cell Disease Program, Aflac Cancer Center and Blood Disorders Service, CHOA; 
C. Jason Wang MD, PhD, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Public Health, Boston University and Boston Medical Center

Specialized, comprehensive healthcare markedly improves outcomes in children with sickle cell disease (SCD), but national quality indicators for SCD have not been developed and implemented.  This two-part session will:  1) review experience with standardizing and assessing the quality of care at a SCD program that provides comprehensive outpatient and inpatient services to >1,600 children with SCD, and 2) review recent progress towards the development of national quality-of-care indicators for SCD.

Community Organizations Staff

Quality Improvement Fundamentals: An Introduction to Jump-Start Curriculum

Lloyd Provost MS, Improvement Advisor, Associates in Process Improvement

This full day session will focus on the Model for Improvement and is designed as a beginning or refresher course on methodology. Participants will learn how to implement the Model for Improvement in their own organizations through interactive activities and examples. Participants will be able to create a program, design an effective aim statement and develop defined measures for an improved project.

Using Photovoices to Engage Latina Teens in Research and Advocacy for a Healthier Community
Level 2 intermediate

Robert Dudley MD, National Public Health Scholar, Community Health Center Inc., New Britain, Connecticut;
Jayme Hannay PhD, MPH, Special Projects Consultant, Community Health Center Inc.

Participants will learn about Photovoices, a summer youth employment program for Puerto Rican teens. Using disposable cameras, the youth took photos answering three questions. The youth organized the photos into a poster and presented their research at the Spanish Speaking Center. Photovoices can be used to focus on a single gender, age, or racial/ethnic group but it is equally appropriate for promoting dialogue, understanding and collective action across multiple generations, races, and genders. Photovoices is a feasible, cost-effective, culturally relevant and fun intervention for teaching leadership and advocacy skills to teens in an obesity prevention program.

MEND: Implementing a Scalable, Community-Centered and Family-Focused Obesity Intervention  Part 1
Level 2 intermediate

Chris Calitz BA (Hons), Partnership Development Director (North America), MEND, UK;
Joann Donnelly MA, CHFI, Training and Innovation Director, MEND Foundation;
Sarah E. Barlow MD, MPH, Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine;
James Finck BA, President /CEO, YMCA of Austin

The MEND Program is the one of the world’s largest after school, evidence-based obesity interventions that is family-focused and community-centered. The program uses trained multidisciplinary teams to deliver a standardized, multi-component curriculum in community settings such as recreation centers, schools and community halls. The program was adapted to US dietary, physical activity and policy guidelines. Pilot testing commenced in Fall 2009 in Austin and Houston, Texas, through public-private partnership funding. This session will provide a history and overview of the MEND Program, its international clinical research and implementation, the US adaptation and a discussion on its role and delivery within the context of the US healthcare system.

Step Up to Health - Addressing Obesity & Diabetes in Minority Youth
Level 2 intermediate

Warren Isenhour, Director, Step Up to Health;
Kimberlee Wyche-Etheridge MD, Director - Family, Youth, & Infant, Metro Nashville Public Health Department

Participants will learn about a cutting edge program designed to get youth physically active and combat diabetes and obesity through the use of the culturally unique art form of stepping.  Presenters will share in depth the programs structure, implementation, and successes. This program targets minority youth and addresses the disparities in health and wellness facing them.  Participants will be able to recognize the art form of stepping, explain it to others, and replicate it while understanding how the use of culturally specific art forms and activities can enhance the ability to reach demographic groups that associate with this specific cultural art form.

Adolescent and Parent Attitudes About Obesity in an Urban Community Health Center
Level 2 intermediate

Sandra Goldsmith MS, RD, CDN, Director of Nutrition Services, Community Pediatric Programs (CPP), The Children’s Health Fund and Montefiore Medical Center

The South Bronx Health Center for Children and Families (SBHCCF), a program of the Children’s Health Fund and the Children’s Hospital at Montefiore created Starting Right, a multi-disciplinary pediatric obesity program that is integrated into its primary care practice. The Starting Right Initiative conducted a qualitative study exploring adolescent and parent attitudes about obesity and behavior change to enhance provider-patient communication and inform program development. The session will detail programmatic changes that resulted from this research, the development of provider training and how SBHCCF linked with other community based organizations to deliver nutrition and fitness programming to its patients. This session will take participants through the conclusions drawn from this research.

Families

Quality Improvement in Pediatric Literacy Promotion: The Reach Out and Read Experience
Level 2 intermediate
Family Leader Session

Lee M. Sanders MD, MPH, Associate Professor of Pediatrics, University of Miami;
Barbara Ducharme MBA, EdM, National Programs Director, Reach Out and Read

Reach Out and Read (ROR) QI is a clinic-based model developed to improve delivery of the ROR model of early literacy promotion. It measures delivery of care outcomes and family perception of those outcomes. The ability to input and review data instantaneously on-line allows for real-time review and immediate allowing for improved coordination of care, better delivery of systems and improved outcomes. Participants will learn about how all team members to identify current systems, initiate change, and collecting data, and to monitor progress.

Scope of a Tertiary Center Care Coordination Program for Medically Complex and Fragile Children with Chronic Conditions
Level 2 intermediate
Family Leader Session

John B. Gordon MD, Medical director, Special Needs Program, Children's Hospital of Wisconsin;
Holly Colby RN, MS, Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin;
Anne Juhlmann BSN, Nurse Planner, Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin

The goal of this presentation is to describe the clinical and academic activities of a well established tertiary academic center care coordination program with particular emphasis on ensuring seamless inpatient and outpatient care through partnerships with families and Medical Homes, approaches to educating the next generation of physicians and nurses about the needs of this growing population; and strategies for ensuring sustainability and ability to replicate the model.

New Jersey Smiles: A Medicaid Quality Collaborative to Improve Oral Health in Young Kids
Level 1 core
Family Leader Session

Sheree Neese-Todd MA, Senior Program Officer, Children’s Health Quality, Center for Health Care Strategies

The Center of Health Care Strategies (CHCS) bought together New Jersey's (NJ) five Medicaid managed care health plans (MCOs), NJ Medicaid, and other regional partners committed to improving access to oral health services for young children. The collaborative developed standardized tools for community providers, teachers, and families. The innovations developed and tested during this 18 month NJ Smiles collaborative benefited from the current national “cross system” policy initiatives that target oral health improvements for very young children. Participants will learn about plans to extend and apply the lessons learned from the NJ Smiles quality collaborative in other settings.

Quality Improvement in the Management of Children with Sickle Cell Disease
Level 1 core
Family Leader Session

Peter A. Lane MD, Director, Sickle Cell Disease Program, Aflac Cancer Center and Blood Disorders Service, CHOA; 
C. Jason Wang MD, PhD, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Public Health, Boston University and Boston Medical Center

Specialized, comprehensive healthcare markedly improves outcomes in children with sickle cell disease (SCD), but national quality indicators for SCD have not been developed and implemented.  This two-part session will:  1) review experience with standardizing and assessing the quality of care at a SCD program that provides comprehensive outpatient and inpatient services to >1,600 children with SCD, and 2) review recent progress towards the development of national quality-of-care indicators for SCD.

Early Childhood Caries (ECC): Disease Management Using a Chronic Care Model
Level 2 intermediate
Family Leader Session

Man Wai Ng DDS, MPH, Chief of the Department of Dentistry, Children’s Hospital Boston;
B. Alex White DDS, DrPH, Director of Analytics, DentaQuest Institute

Early childhood caries (ECC) is an almost completely preventable disease but effective prevention and management requires risk indicators be identified early in children and preventive practices implemented in infancy. Participants will learn about a successful evidence-based, risk-based disease management approach to ECC using the chronic care model, adopted from the concept of chronic care management of medical conditions.  Practical strategies will be offered on how to redesign any dental/medical practice to implement risk-based ECC prevention and management to address the causes of the disease in patients and not just the consequences.

Operation Prevent Flu Meets H1N1-The Unseasonal Surge in a Children's Healthcare System
Level 1 core
Family Leader Session

J. Renee Warner Watson, Manager-Infection Control and Occupational Health, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta;
Marianne Hatfield BSN, RN, CENP, System Director of Emergency Services, CHOA;
Dan Kotz CHEC, Emergency Management Coordinator, CHOA

Children's Healthcare of Atlanta (CHOA) experienced extreme surges of emergency room volumes during August and September 2009. This surge related to the highest prevalence of H1N1 influenza within the United States. The healthcare system could have been disabled had it not been for the multidisciplinary approach and the development of seven related teams working to ensure patient safety, and employee safety in the face of staff shortages and supply shortages. Participants will learn how the team process was utilized and will be provided the tools developed to balance science with logistics to ensure that no negative outcomes were realized.

Office Based Prevention of Child Abuse: The Practicing Safety Project
Level 2 intermediate
Family Leader Session

Steven Kairys MD, MPH, Chairman of Pediatrics, Jersey Shore University Medical Center

The presentation will provide detailed information about office based approaches to child abuse prevention. It will highlight a learning collaborative process and will review the evidence to date about the capacity of primary care to impact the epidemic of child abuse. One such approach is Practicing Safety (PS), which is designed to increase the capacity of pediatric practices to prevent abuse and neglect. Results showed that practices made fundamental changes in decision-making, assessment and parent education processes. Practices tailored change to their unique practice culture based on complex adaptive system theory. Participants will learn detailed data about the intervention, the role of primary care in child abuse prevention, and the barriers to dissemination.

Partnering With Your Doctor - The Medical Home Approach
Level I core
Family Leader Session

Rev. David Hoffman, Associate Pastor, Worthington United Methodist Church, Member of the Parent Advisory Committee for the Bureau of Children with Medical Handicaps of the Ohio Department of Health;
Jodi A. Griffin MPA, Project Coordinator, Systems Reform Program Michigan Public Health Institute

Participants will learn about a guide that was created by a multidisciplinary team to promote medical home.  This tool is a part of the partnership development process between families and health care providers to provide children with access to quality care. The session will provide a variety of tools, resources, and a free hard copy of the guide itself to utilize in addition to post-Forum access to resources on promoting the use of the medical home model through marketing and e-communication strategies. Based on what is known of the medical home model, the development of this guide and family-doctor partnership offer promising results in the increased access of quality care and advocacy for children with special health care needs.

Fit for Life: Family Centered Approach in Promoting Health and Wellness in Infants and Toddlers
Level 2 intermediate

Acklema Mohammad MD, Pediatrics Department Section Head, Urban Health Plan, Inc.; 
Shamiza Ally MD, Pediatrician, Urban Health Plan, Inc.;
Justine Springer, Project Coordinator, Fit for Life

The Fit for Life performance improvement team uses an interdisciplinary team-based, family-centered approach by targeting caregivers of children from birth through 36 months of age for intervention. The project design provides comprehensive services that lay the groundwork for the caregivers to continue healthy eating habits, which promotes healthy weight maintenance throughout the child's life. The Program engages in a preparation of a family focused self-management plan supported by monthly visits to a nutritionist, and telephone support.  Participants will learn how to set simple yet effective self-management goals with caregivers and how to implement this program in their own organizations.

Health Information Technology Professionals

Making Use of Pediatric Health Information Technology Truly Meaningful

Daniel Nigrin MD, MS, Senior VP for Information Services & Chief Information Officer Division of Endocrinology & Informatics Program, Children's Hospital Boston;
Marvin B. Harper MD, Chief Medical Information Officer, Children’s Hospital Boston;
Darlene Vendittelli MSM, IT Project Director, Children’s Hospital Boston
Christoph U. Lehmann MD, Director, Clinical Information Technology, JHCMSC    

Inpatient and outpatient electronic health records are becoming more and more widespread; stimulus dollars promise to accelerate adoption even more. Happily for those committed to improvement in care, health IT efforts increasingly focus on its use to improve care.
 
What are the keys to using health information technology to meaningfully improve care - not simply meeting criteria, but actually improving important processes and outcomes of care? In this Exploratorium, you will hear from leaders in one real world integrated children's healthcare organization - Children's Hospital, Boston - and how they are using technology to improve care across the continuum of care - inpatient, outpatient and community, and patient directed. The emphasis will be on what the keys have been to their success so that you can apply these lessons in your own setting. The session will also point to some cutting edge initiatives with even greater potential to enhance quality and family engagement. In addition, participants will learn about the federal policy environment affecting health IT, how it may affect you and what you can do to shape that policy so that the specific needs of children's healthcare are addressed.

HIT Policy and Practice: Making Information Technology Work for Child Health

Gary Frank MD, MS, Pediatric Hospitalist, Scottish Rite Pediatric and Adolescent Consultants, Medical Director of Quality and Medical Management, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta;
David A. Bergman MD, Associate Professor in Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine

Federal policy is seeking to rapidly accelerate the adoption and use of health information technology to improve care and lower costs. Will it work? Will children receive the benefit? This panel will discuss the latest federal initiatives, how the pediatric community is seeking to influence that policy so that it better addresses the needs of children and their providers, and some cutting edge applications of what health IT is doing to improve care.

The Confluence of HIT, Medical Home, and P4P for Pediatric Quality

William Millar Zurhellen MD, FAAP, President and Chief Executive Officer, Putnam Valley Pediatrics, P.C.;
Christopher Stille MD, Professor, University of Massachusetts

The innovative session is designed to acquaint participants with the use of health information technology to produce the data required to satisfy the requirements for NCQA certification, and HEDIS measures involved in P4P programs. The confluence of three important factors has finally provided the basis for promoting quality in health care. This presentation discusses HEDIS measures, data requirements, NCQA certification for the Medical Home, and then provides the background for IT systems that can integrate quality and financial factors for quality care. Participants will develop thorough understanding of payer mechanisms for measuring quality and designing P4P, P4Q, and PQRI programs as well as NCQA Medical Home certification is conducted and how a structured framework can enhance accreditation efforts.

Making the White Board the "Right Board:" Integrating IT to Improve Ward Patient Awareness

Troy L. McGuire MD, FAAP, Director of Medical Informatics, Pediatric Hospitalist, Children's Hospital of Orange County (CHOC);
Jill Fargo MSN, FNP, RN, NEA-BC, Clinical Director, Medical Surgical Services, CHOC;
Ruth Slater, Director Patient Care Informatics, CHOC

Background Miscommunication is at root of most significant medical error. Incorporating the Pediatric Early Warning System (PEWS) physiology-based monitoring of ward patients, we converted from a traditional Nursing Station white board to a large, EMR-connected LCD, providing an instant “snapshot” of patient acuity thereby advancing efforts to improve communication and situational awareness of patient status. Our design dramatically improves organizational awareness of non-ICU patient status by attempting to reduce the chances for miscommunication to occur. Participants will learn how this eBoard model can readily be applied to inpatient settings by design. Modifications could easily be performed in almost unlimited fashion to almost any clinical scenario.

Pediatric Residents

Quality Improvement Fundamentals: An Introduction to Jump-Start Curriculum

Lloyd Provost MS, Improvement Advisor, Associates in Process Improvement

This full day session will focus on the Model for Improvement and is designed as a beginning or refresher course on methodology. Participants will learn how to implement the Model for Improvement in their own organizations through interactive activities and examples. Participants will be able to create a program, design an effective aim statement and develop defined measures for an improvement project.

Developing a Safety Program: How to Move Your “Dots”

Peter Lachman, Consultant, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust and Royal Free Hospital Hampstead NHS Trust;
Jayant Deshpande,  Executive Physician for Patient Quality and Safety, Monroe Carell, Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt; 
Anne Matlow MD, Medical Director of Patient Safety and the Director of the Infection Prevention and Control at Sick Kids Hospital in Toronto, Professor in the Departments of Pediatrics, and Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology at the University of Toronto;  
Stephen Muething MD, Associate Professor at the University of Cincinnati and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center;  
Matt Scanlon MD, Associate Professor of Pediatrics in Critical Care at Medical College of Wisconsin, and Associate Medical Director of Information Services at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin;
Paul Sharek MD, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Stanford University, a pediatric hospitalist, and Medical Director of Quality Management and Chief Clinical Patient Safety Officer at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital

Patient safety is now a prerequisite in healthcare. All services need to define their outcomes in terms of safety and quality. The vulnerability of children makes the importance of patient safety a key factor in the delivery of healthcare delivery. This session will be an in-depth examination of the fundamentals of patient safety in pediatrics and child heath and the specific risks children and neonates face. The session will focus on measurement and how it can be used to accelerate change.

Without a Tracer…Your Hospital May Fail to See Risks Lurking Within the System

Ginny Boos RN, BSN, CPHQ, Clinical Safety Officer, Children’s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics (CMHC);
Carol Kemper RN, PhD, CPHQ, Senior Director of Quality and Safety, CMHC;
Carol Moore RN, BSN, QI Project Coordinator Department of Quality and Safety, CMHC;
Sheryl Chadwick, Family Centered Care Coordinator, CMHC; DeeJo Miller, Family Centered Care Coordinator, CMHC

Keeping patients safe within the healthcare organization requires an understanding of the effectiveness of internal processes and risks inherent in the system. Tracer methods are used to evaluate system functioning proactively and guide quality initiatives. This session will guide participants in the development of a tracer program and describe how tracers enhance an established quality improvement program. Children’s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics (CMHC) implemented a qualitative program consisting of 4 types of tracers. The four types of tracers that will be discussed are Traditional, High Risk, Patient Flow, and Patient Experience.

Childhood Obesity Advocacy Training for Healthcare Professionals
Level 1 core

Dexter Louie MD, JD, Chair, CMA Foundation; Elissa K. Maas MPH, Vice President of Programs, CMA Foundation;
Victoria Weeks Rogers MD, Director, The Kids CO-OP (Clinical Outcomes and Outreach Program) at The Barbara Bush Children's Hospital at Maine Medical Center;
Lisa Simpson MB, BCh, MPH, FAAP, Director, Child Policy Research Center, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

This training is intended for healthcare professionals who are interested in impacting the obesity epidemic through community advocacy.  After completing the all day training session, participants will have a greater understanding of how to impact change through policy, media, coalition building, and the legislative process.  Participants will leave the session with a personal advocacy plan based on best practices to use in their fight against childhood obesity.  All healthcare disciplines and levels, novice to advanced advocates, are welcome.

QI Learning Collaborative to Improve the Documentation of BMI and Nutrition and Activity Counseling
Level 2 intermediate

Steve Cook MD, MPH, Assistant Professor, University of Rochester;
Thomas McInerny MD, Professor of Pediatrics, University of Rochester

The Greater Rochester Obesity Collaborative is working with local pediatric practices using a quality improvement learning collaborative approach as the framework to improve BMI documentation, classification and counseling rates for nutrition and activity. Participants will learn about the documented improvements in all of the targeted process measures and how these results suggest that the learning collaborative efforts promoted improvements in obesity identification and counseling.

We Can!(TM): Science-Based Childhood Obesity Prevention via Clinical Settings
Level 1 core

Karen Donato, Acting Branch Chief, Enhanced Dissemination and Utilization Branch Coordinator, Overweight and Obesity Research Applications National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute;
Wanda Montalvo RN, MSN, ANP, Clinical Director, New York State Diabetes Campaign

In response to the public health crisis associated with childhood overweight, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has developed We Can! TM, Ways to Enhance Children’s Activity & Nutrition, a national education program that brings families and communities together to promote healthy weight in children ages 8 through 13. This presentation will provide participants with an overview of the science behind the program and will offer a clear understanding of the program’s available resources, together with ways to implement the program in their own outpatient and office settings.

Office based Prevention of Child Abuse: The Practicing Safety Project
Level 2 intermediate
Family Leader Session

Steven Kairys MD, MPH, Chairman of Pediatrics, Jersey Shore University Medical Center

The presentation will provide detailed information about office based approaches to child abuse prevention. It will highlight a learning collaborative process and will review the evidence to date about the capacity of primary care to impact the epidemic of child abuse. One such approach is Practicing Safety (PS), which is designed to increase the capacity of pediatric practices to prevent abuse and neglect. Results showed that practices made fundamental changes in decision-making, assessment and parent education processes. Practices tailored change to their unique practice culture based on complex adaptive system theory. Participants will learn detailed data about the intervention, the role of primary care in child abuse prevention, and the barriers to dissemination.

Designing a Robust Quality Improvement Program for Pediatric Residents
Level 2 intermediate

Greg Randolph MD, MPH, Co-Director, North Carolina Children’s Center for Clinical Excellence;
Laura Noonan MD, Director, Center for Pediatric Excellence, Department of Pediatrics, Levine Children’s Hospital at Carolinas Medical Center

This session will describe two models that have successfully aligned resident education with the need for improved quality of care. The Residency Programs at University of North Carolina and Carolinas Medical Center have developed comprehensive Resident QI Programs to assure each resident acquires knowledge about QI methods and tools and learns how to incorporate QI into their clinical practice. These programs incorporate QI by providing a standardized, longitudinal, mentored, experiential curriculum with the goal of increasing residents' knowledge, skills, and abilities to apply QI.  Participants will be provided with the basic tools and implementation strategies that can be used to create or improve their organization's residency QI program.

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